heesbees

All for Quran & Tajweed

Al-Madd Al-Laazim: Harfee May 25, 2011

NOTE: if you are new to the website, please click here for a brief guide.

This post is a continuation from the previous: Al-Madd Al-Laazim: Kalimee

If you’ve made it to this point… then know that you’re just 6 counts away from finishing the foundational tajweed rules! :) One last omph and you can badge up a .:mujawwid/ah:. tag and stick it on your galaabeeyah  :)

Al-Madd Al-Laazim Al-Harfee: letter based necessary prolongation is the second branch of al-madd al-laazim. This posts discusses the difference between al-madd al-laazim harfee mukhfaffaf and harfee muthaqal as outlined in the diagram.

Both types of madd laazim harfee only apply to those chapters in the Quran that start with letters. Some of these surahs include Surat Al-Baqarah, Surat Maryam, and Surat Qaaf. Each surah begins with letters that have a special case, all of which the al-madd al-laazim tajweed rule covers.

First it should be noted that there are 3 exceptions.

The first of which is the letter alif ( ا ). This letter is not prolonged, rather it is said plainly: “alif”.

Next, the letters,

ح      ي      ط      هـ      ر

raa,      haa,      taa,      yaa,      haa,

are only prolonged for 2 counts. You can remember these letters by remembering the phrase

حي طهر

hayy tuhr

Note: these letters are not said as they are in the alphabet. Meaning, you do not say yaa’ ( ياء ) rather, only yaa ( يا ) is said. This applies for all 5 letters.

The last exception is the letter ‘ayn (  ع ). This letter, as agreed upon by many scholars, can be prolonged for 2, 4, or 6 counts with 4 counts being the preferred length. I haven’t completely grasped the wisdom behind this – maybe you could input your knowledge of this exception. :)

Al-madd al-laazim hafree muthaqal (heavy letter based necessary prolongation) only occurs in one form (in the Quran).  It is where one of the letters (at the opening of a surah) is pronounced using three sounds, where the middle sound is a harf madd and the last sound is merged with the beginning sound of the next letter.

Let’s put this into context. The opening of Surat Al-Baqarah is alif – laam – meem.

One of these letters is pronounced with three sounds. It is laam.

ل

pronounced ( لام )

The first sound is “L” the second, a harf madd is “aa” (for alif) and the third is a meem, “mm”.

The next letter after laam is meem. The last sound of laam is “mm” and the beginning sound of meem is “mm”, hence the two “mm” sounds are merged during recitation, fulfilling the conditions of heavy letter based necessary prolongation.

The example:

alif – laaammeeem


Al-madd al-laazim hafree mukhaffaf (light letter based necessary prolongation) applies to those letters which do not merge. Each letter is prolonged for 6 counts, except where the above exceptions occur. The letters for this type of madd have 3 sounds. The middle is a harf madd, and the end is a saakin (hence why no merging occurs). An example is the letter qaaf.

ق

pronounced ( قافْ )

The first sound is a “Q”. The second a harf madd, “aa” for alif, the third is a saakin faa “ff”.

The letters that apply to this type of madd are,

ن      ق      ص      ع      س      ل      ك      م

meem,    kaaf,    laam,    seen,    ‘ayn,    saad,    qaaf,    noon

You can remember these letters by remembering the phrase,

نقصَ عَسَلُكُم

naqasa ‘asalukum

Examples of light letter based necessary prolongation are as follow [where cts = counts]:

haa meeem

2 cts  -  6 cts

kaaaf haa yaa ‘ayyn saaad

6 cts – 2 cts – 2 cts – 4 cts – 6 cts

‘ayyn seeen qaaaf

4 cts – 6 cts – 6 cts

nooon

6 cts

I’ve run out of breath. Hope everything makes sense.

If you need any clarifications, buzz through. :)

Resources Link:

‘Jadwal Al-Mudood’, ninth madd listed

- ‘Tajweed Basics Foundations And More’ covers a range of mudood

Note, these documents are found on the resources page.

Related Posts: Ahkaam Al-Madd – Al-Madd Al-Tabee’ee – Al-Madd Al-Waajib Al-Mutasil – Al-Madd Al-Jaa’ez Al-Munfasil - Al-Madd Al-’Iwad - Al-Madd Al-Badal – Al-Madd Al-Leen - Al-Madd Al-’Aarid Lil Sukoon - Al-Madd Al-Laazim: Kalimee.

 

Al-Madd Al-Laazim: Kalimee May 15, 2011

NOTE: if you are new to the website, please click here for a brief guide.

Do you enjoy really long walks? By the seaside or greenery? If you enjoy lengthy “anythings”, then you’ll definitely enjoy sounding this lengthy madd

Al-Madd Al-Laazim: necessary prolongation is the longest madd in tajweed. It is an umbrella term that branches into 2 types, which also branch into another 2 types, hence making a total of 6 types of necessary prolongation.

In this post I will discuss the right branch of al-madd al-laazim.

The right branch is kalimee (word based). This branches out again into two types, the first, muthaqal (heavy) and the second, mukhaffaf (light).

The rule for necessary prolongation is an occurrence of a grammatical (Arabic) rule. This rule says that no two saakin letters can follow one another (as this is very difficult on the tongue). To abide by this rule, a madd is slotted between the two saakins for 6 counts. Let’s now differentiate between light and heavy word based necessary prolongations.

Al-madd al-laazim al-kalimee al-muthaqal (heavy word based necessary prolongation) occurs in words that have a laazim saakin letter (where the letter has sukoon as part of the original make up of the word) after a harf madd. This sukoon is a result of a shaddah. As explained in a previous post, a shaddah causes a letter to be doubled where the first occurrence has a sukoon, and the second has a diacritic (more about shaddah here). Examples of al-madd al-laazim al-kalimee al-muthaqal are as follow:

Al-haaaqqah

Wal-saaaffaat

Al-daaalleen


Al-madd al-laazim al-kalimee al-mukhaffaf (light word based necessary prolongation) occurs in a word where a harf madd is followed by a laazim saakin letter whereby this sukoon is not merged with another letter. What does this mean? Just above I said that a shaddah causes the doubling of a letter, and hence, you are merging the first occurrence with the second to make it sound as 1 mushaddad letter. In this case, the letter with a saakin is not because of a shaddah, it is just a sukoon ( ْْْْo ْ) that is part of the original make up of the word. This type of necessary prolongation is sounded for 6 counts.

This type of madd only occurs twice in the Quran. The word is the same, even the surah is the same. Here it is:

Surat Yunus; Ayah 51:

Aaal-aana waqad kuntum bihi tastajiloona

Surat Yunus; Ayah 91:

Aaal-aana waqad ‘asayta

Considering this madd is so long, I’ve tried my best to keep this post short! :)

Hope everything makes sense, though. Let me know if it doesn’t.

Resources Link:

‘Jadwal Al-Mudood’, ninth madd listed

Sukoon [Gatway To Arabic: page 48]

- ‘Tajweed Basics Foundations And More’ covers a range of mudood

- Shaddah [Tajweed Basics: Foundations and More: page 2]

[Gatway To Arabic: page 49]

Note, these documents are found on the resources page.

Related Posts: Ahkaam Al-Madd – Al-Madd Al-Tabee’ee – Al-Madd Al-Waajib Al-Mutasil – Al-Madd Al-Jaa’ez Al-Munfasil - Al-Madd Al-’Iwad - Al-Madd Al-Badal – Al-Madd Al-Leen - Al-Madd Al-’Aarid Lil Sukoon - Al-Madd Al-Laazim: Harfee.

 

Al-Madd Al-Silah: Kubra & Sughra May 11, 2011

NOTE: if you are new to the website, please click here for a brief guide.

The time it takes to repair and re-connect depends on how frequent you undergo a check up. Remember to revisit your heart’s checklist [emotion, faith, intentions, etc] occasionally in order to shorten the time it needs to wholeheartedly repent and re-connect with Allah. Keep in mind though, this isn’t the only connection you’ll need to take care of…..

Al-Madd Al-Silah[1]the connecting prolongation directly relates to the grammatical rule regarding the [possessive] pronoun that represents a third party of male gender. This [possessive] pronoun is simply the addition of the letter haa ( هــ ) at the end of a word. Therefore the referred third party is not part of the original make up of the word. At the end of a word, the letter haa looks like this ( ــه ).

The purpose of this madd is to lengthen the dammah in order for it to sound like a waaw (و) or to lengthen the kasra to sound like a yaa (ي). Explanation below.

Al-madd al-silah separates into two types: kubra (longer) and sughra (lesser).

Al-madd al-silah al-sughra (the lesser connecting prolongation) has the following conditions:

- the madd becomes void if the reciter stops at the end of the word, sounding a haa saakin, i.e. you must continue to the next word in order to sound this madd

- the haa on the end of the word must not be part of the original word

- the haa sits between two voweled letters (two letters that have a diacritic on them – neither of the two can have a sukoon)

the haa is not followed by a hamzah ( ء or أ )

- the haa is voweled with either a dammah or a kasra, but NOT a fat-ha

- the dammah or kasra is lengthened for 2 counts only


Al-madd al-silah al-kubra (the longer/larger connecting prolongation) has the following conditions:

- the madd becomes void if the reciter stops at the end of the word, sounding a haa saakin, i.e. you must continue to the next word in order to sound this madd

- the haa on the end of the word must not be part of the original word

- the haa sits between two voweled letters (two letters that have a diacritic on them – neither of the two can have a sukoon)

the haa must be followed by a hamzah ( ء or أ )

- the haa is voweled with either a dammah or a kasra, but NOT a fat-ha

the dammah or kasra is lengthened for 4 -5 counts

Conditions 1, 2, 3, and 5 are the same for kubra and sughra.

Examples of al-madd al-silah sughra:

lahuu maa fee

‘ibaadihii khabeeraa

kitaabahuu waraa’a

Examples of al-madd al-silah kubra:

maalahooo akhladahu

haathiheee eemaanan

 

wathaaqahuuu ahadun

So did you notice anything similar throughout the examples?

Yes, something other than the fact they are all madd silah:)

Did you notice a little waaw and a little yaa after the [possessive] pronoun haa?

These little symbols make this madd too easy!

Notice on the madd silah kubra, all the little symbols have a madd above them).

Notice on the madd silah sughra, all the little symbols don’t have anything above or below!

As you read, just do a check. Does this haa have a little waaw or yaa after it? If so, then know it’s madd silah.

Does this little waaw or yaa have a madd squiggle on top? If so, then it’s a silah kubra, and stretch your yaa or waaw for 4 – 5 counts.

Simple! Right?

Before I close off this post, I want to note that there are some exemptions.

Two exemptions for silah sughra are as follow:

Here there is no madd although all the madd silah sughra conditions are met:

yardahu lakum

Here there is a madd although not all the madd silah sughra conditions are met (there is a harf saakin before the haa):

feehii muhaanan

Note 1: there is a third case where the possessive pronoun haa is feminine. In this case, madd silah is still done:

haathihii tathkiratun

Note 2: in case you wanted an example of when the haa is part of the original makeup of a word, here it is below:

fawaakihu wa hum mukramoona

All the conditions of madd silah are present (except the haa being unoriginal). It is because of this, that no madd silah is said.

Resources Link:

‘Jadwal Al-Mudood’, eighth madd listed

-Short and long vowels  [Gatway To Arabic: pages 21-23; and 44-47]

- ‘Tajweed Basics Foundations And More’ covers a range of mudood

Note, these documents are found on the resources page.

Related Posts: Ahkaam Al-Madd – Al-Madd Al-Tabee’ee – Al-Madd Al-Waajib Al-Mutasil – Al-Madd Al-Jaa’ez Al-Munfasil - Al-Madd Al-’Iwad - Al-Madd Al-Badal – Al-Madd Al-Leen - Al-Madd Al-’Aarid Lil Sukoon - Al-Madd Al-Laazim: Kalimee - Al-Madd Al-Laazim: Harfee.



[1] Al-Madd Al-Silah Al-Kubra wa Al-Sughra: المد الصلة الكبرى و الصغرى


 

Al-Madd Al-’Aarid Lil Sukoon April 17, 2011

NOTE: if you are new to the website, please click here for a brief guide.

Have you ever been in those situations where an awkward silence is bound to happen? And when it does, it feels as though time stretches tenfold? Check out what happens to this stretchy prolongation when it hits a short silence (sukoon)!

http://blog.jalbum.net/blog/jalbum/resource/tips/interior_photography_m.jpg

Al-Madd Al-‘Aarid Lil Sukoon[1]: temporary prolongation occurs only at the end of an ayah (or when stopping after a word) that has a harf madd in it (ا    or     ي     or    و). There are certain conditions to this madd, these are as follow.

-The harf madd should be the 2nd last letter in the word

-The sukoon is found in stopping on [the sound of] the last letter of the word

-The harf madd must not have a fat-ha, dammah or kasra on it, e.g. ( يـَ   or   يـِ   or  يـُ )

-The preceding letter must have a suitable diacritic, i.e. dammah for waaw, fat-ha for alif, kasra for yaa

-The reciter must stop after the word being recited in order to sound this madd 4 or 6 counts

-The reciter can sound this madd for 2 counts whether they are stopping or not, but generally, 2 counts are sounded only when the reciter wishes to continue.

In the special case where a fat-ha precedes the harf madd yaa or waaw, it becomes known as al-madd al-leen, covered in this post. Al-madd al-leen has the same principles as al-madd al-‘aarid lil sukoon.

Examples of al-madd al-‘aarid lil sukoon:

yastawfooon

al-‘aalameeen

al-fasaaad

Resources Link:

-Sukoon [Gatway To Arabic: page 48]

‘Jadwal Al-Mudood’, seventh madd listed

- ‘Tajweed Basics Foundations And More’ covers a range of mudood

Note, these documents are found on the resources page.

Related Posts: Ahkaam Al-Madd – Al-Madd Al-Tabee’ee – Al-Madd Al-Waajib Al-Mutasil – Al-Madd Al-Jaa’ez Al-MunfasilAl-Madd Al-’IwadAl-Madd Al-BadalAl-Madd Al-Leen - Al-Madd Al-Silah: Kubra & Sughra - Al-Madd Al-Laazim: Kalimee - Al-Madd Al-Laazim: Harfee.


[1] Al-Madd Al-‘Aarid Lil Sukoon: المد العارد للسكون

 

Al-Madd Al-Leen April 5, 2011


NOTE: if you are new to the website, please click here for a brief guide.

Lean meat, lean on me, leniency…. Which “leen” is it? Let’s find out.

Al-Madd Al-Leen[1]: easy/eased prolongation only occurs when the reciter is stopping recitation after the word containing the madd, eg. for a breath, or at the end of an ayah, etc.

Let’s look at why this is so.

Al-madd al-leen occurs when a waaw saakinah ( وْ ) or a yaa saakinah ( يْ ) are preceded by a letter with the fat-h diacritic ( ــَـ).

To be able to sound al-madd al-leen, the yaa or waaw must be “stretched” and not simply read with a sukoon.

The length of elongation is a choice made by the reader of either:

2 counts; or

4 counts; or

6 counts.

But not all three.

Or two.

Or a mix.

Conditions of al-madd al-leen:

-it’s letters are waaw saakinah and yaa saakinah

-these letters must be preceded by a letter that has a fat-ha

-to sound this madd, the reciter must stop after saying the word containing the madd (otherwise the madd is void).

Contrary to Al-Madd Al-’Iwad, this madd becomes void if you are not going to stop at the end of the word. An example of this is as follows:

Al-bayta mathaabatan

Here we can see that the conditions of al-madd al-leen are fulfiled in that the harf madd yaa has been preceded by a fat-ha. But we do not stretch this yaa for 2, 4, or 6 counts. Why? Because we continued onto the next word, mathaabatan.

It is situations like these that al-madd al-leen becomes completely void.

An example of when you do sound al-madd al-leen:

Ahla-l-bayti

Ahla-l-lbayyt

Visible after the word bayt, is the “jeem” character noting to the reciter it is preferable to stop reading. In this situation, we stretch the yaa in bayt for 2, 4 or 6 counts and stop for a breath. More examples:

Khawwf

Al-sayyf

A side note to readers who are more knowledgeable in Tajweed: al-madd al-leen relies on al-madd al-’aarid lil sukoon. If you are going to stop after a word, you sound the ‘aarid madd. This is the same case with al-madd al-leen only it’s special case has been noted down as an entirely different tajweed rule.

Resources Link:

-Sukoon [Gatway To Arabic: page 48]

‘Jadwal Al-Mudood’, sixth madd listed

- ‘Tajweed Basics Foundations And More’ covers a range of mudood

Note, these documents are found on the resources page.

Related Posts: Ahkaam Al-Madd – Al-Madd Al-Tabee’ee – Al-Madd Al-Waajib Al-Mutasil – Al-Madd Al-Jaa’ez Al-MunfasilAl-Madd Al-’IwadAl-Madd Al-BadalAl-Madd Al-‘Aarid Lil Sukoon - Al-Madd Al-Silah: Kubra & Sughra - Al-Madd Al-Laazim: Kalimee - Al-Madd Al-Laazim: Harfee.


[1] Al-Madd Al-Leen: المد اللين

 

Al-Madd Al-Badal March 31, 2011

NOTE: if you are new to the website, please click here for a brief guide.

This madd is very simple. Almost as simple as the madd tabee‘ee, in fact. You might just be surprised to know you have been doing this madd since you first started reading Quran without even realising it… Have a read for yourself….

long picture

Al-Madd Al-Badal: substituted prolongation occurs when a hamza (ء) preceeds a harf madd (ا    or     ي     or    و).

This madd is sounded for two counts when continuing recitation or stopping after the word with the madd.

This madd is only found within one word, and occurs when the hamza has the respective diacritic on it, e.g. if the harf madd ‘waaw’ follows a hamza, the hamza has a dammah on it.

Examples of al-madd al-badal:

Aadama

Ootoo

Eemaanan

The following is an example of a word that does NOT fulfil the conditions of a madd badal, and hence it is not sounded for two counts:

Aymaanahum

To reiterate, the reason this word doesn’t have madd badal is because the hamza before the harf madd has a diacritic not suitable for the harf madd. The suitable diacritic for yaa is kasra, however the hamza here has a fat-ha.

Resources Link:

‘Jadwal Al-Mudood’, fifth madd listed

- ‘Tajweed Basics Foundations And More’ covers a range of mudood

Note, these documents are found on the resources page.

Related Posts: Ahkaam Al-Madd – Al-Madd Al-Tabee’ee – Al-Madd Al-Waajib Al-Mutasil – Al-Madd Al-Jaa’ez Al-MunfasilAl-Madd Al-’IwadAl-Madd Al-LeenAl-Madd Al-‘Aarid Lil Sukoon - Al-Madd Al-Silah: Kubra & Sughra - Al-Madd Al-Laazim: Kalimee - Al-Madd Al-Laazim: Harfee.

 

Al-Madd Al-’Iwad March 17, 2011

NOTE: if you are new to the website, please click here for a brief guide.

Have you ever wondered why many people have opted to take the escalator instead of stairs? Have we compensated health for convenience? Will you sound this compensated madd?

Al-Madd Al-‘Iwad: compensated prolongation, occurs only at the end of a word that has tanween fat-h.

It’s conditions are as follow:

1. A word ends with tanween fat-h (  اً  ) which has caused the word to end with the letter alif (  ا  )

2. You will stop after this word (e.g. you have reached the end of an ayah)

3. You must prolong the alif for two counts without pronouncing the tanween fat-h

4. This madd is void if you are not stopping after the word, i.e. you sound the tanween fat-h and continue reading

Let’s take a look at some examples and view the above conditions practically.

Examples of madd ‘iwad:

madd iwad pic

hakeemaa

madd iwad 2 pic‘athaaban aleemaa

madd iwad 3 picithan abadaa

‘aleeman khabeeraa


Here you can see how the madd becomes void when you are continuing onto the next word, and how it is sounded when you are stopping. Of course, what ever you do, keep in mind that this madd is only for tanween fat-h. You definitely do not say a madd when it is tanween damm or kasr.

Resources link:

-‘Jadwal Al-Mudood’, fourth madd listed

-’Tajweed Basics Foundations And More’ covers a range of mudood

-Tanween [Gatway To Arabic: pages 40-43]

Note, these documents are found on the resources page.

Related Posts: Ahkaam Al-Madd – Al-Madd Al-Tabee’ee – Al-Madd Al-Waajib Al-MutasilAl-Madd Al-Jaa’ez Al-Munfasil Al-Madd Al-
Badal
Al-Madd Al-LeenAl-Madd Al-‘Aarid Lil Sukoon - Al-Madd Al-Silah: Kubra & Sughra - Al-Madd Al-Laazim: Kalimee - Al-Madd Al-Laazim: Harfee.

 

Al-Madd Al-Jaa’ez Al-Munfasil March 14, 2011

NOTE: if you are new to the website, please click here for a brief guide.

Whether you’re doing the splits, visiting Split, or eating a banana split, you can’t go past sounding a [split] permissible prolongation!

http://exploitedtimes.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/10/snapped-rope1.jpg

Al-Madd Al-Jaa’ez Al-Munfasil: Permissible prolongation, occurs when a word ends with a harf madd (ا    or     ي     or    و) and is followed by a word that begins with hamza (ء).

The name here has come about because of it’s rule. Madd means to prolong. Jaa’ez means permissible. Munfasil means detached/separated.

What is meant by munfasil? The madd is sounded over two words, i.e. the finger space between two words should be sounded with a madd.

What is meant by jaa’ez? It is not obligatory to sound this madd. The harf madd can be just sounded for it’s normal length of two counts, i.e. the time it takes to say “one-two”.

Therefore, when you come across a madd jaa’ez munfasil, you have three options:

1. To skip it and just sound the harf madd for 2 counts

2. To sound it for 4 counts

3. To sound it for 5 counts

To reiterate it’s conditions:

1. Must be over two words (if it is in one word, it becomes a madd waajib mutasil)

2. It is not compulsory to sound it

3. If you choose to sound it, you must do so always for the same length, i.e. either 4 or 5 counts, but not both

Examples of a madd jaa’ez munfasil:

fee anfusikum

feeee anfusikum

bimaa anzaltu

bimaaaa anzaltuquu anfusakum

quuuu anfusakum

Important note on Quranic scripture: words that have “yaa” ( يا ) before them are usually connected as seen in the following example. However they are still two words, and the ruling of madd jaa’ez munfasil must be applied to it.

yaa ayyuhal naasu

yaaaa ayyuhal naasu

Resources Link:

-‘Jadwal Al-Mudood’, third madd listed

-’Tajweed Basics Foundations And More’ covers a range of mudood

Note, these documents are found on the resources page.

Related Posts: Ahkaam Al-MaddAl-Madd Al-Tabee’eeAl-Madd Al-Waajib Al-MutasilAl-Madd Al-’IwadAl-Madd Al-
Badal
Al-Madd Al-LeenAl-Madd Al-‘Aarid Lil Sukoon - Al-Madd Al-Silah: Kubra & Sughra - Al-Madd Al-Laazim: Kalimee - Al-Madd Al-Laazim: Harfee.

 

Al-Madd Al-Waajib Al-Mutasil February 1, 2011

NOTE: if you are new to the website, please click here for a brief guide.

What’s your favourite childhood game? Connecting puzzles, connect-a-four, or practicing the connected obligatory prolongation?

Al-Madd Al-Waajib Al-Mutasil: is the obligatory prolongation. It is prolonged for either four or five counts (your choice of either). If you choose to prolong for four counts, then this must remain consistent throughout your recitation. Likewise is if you chose to prolong for five counts.

This madd is obligatory when when a hamzah (ء) follows a harf madd ( ا    or     ي     or    و ) within one word.

To reiterate, the conditions of this madd are:

-Is only done in one word (hence why some refer to it as being “connected”)

-Occurs only when a hamzah follows either of the following letters: alif, yaa, waaw.

-The madd is prolonged for four or five counts, one chosen and used consistently

Four counts is approximately the time it takes to say “one-two-three” at medium pace

Five counts is approximately the time it takes to say “one-two-three-four” at medium pace

Examples:

____________

Al-shitaaa‘                       Yashaaa

_______

Al-Malaaa‘ikatu             Al-saaa‘ila

Yes, three a‘s to emphasise the difference between a normal madd letter and this madd.

For the two other madd letters:

_______

Al-sooo‘u              Wa jeee‘a

Note the second example, wa jee’a. Recall that any madd letter with a sukoon drawn above it remains completely unpronounced.

See post: Al-Madd Al-Tabee’ee

Resources Link:

-‘Jadwal Al-Mudood’ second madd listed

-’Tajweed Basics Foundations And More’ covers a range of mudood

Note, these documents are found on the resources page.

Related Posts: Ahkaam Al-MaddAl-Madd Al-Tabee’eeAl-Madd Al-Jaa’ez Al-MunfasilAl-Madd Al-’IwadAl-Madd Al-BadalAl-Madd Al-LeenAl-Madd Al-‘Aarid Lil Sukoon - Al-Madd Al-Silah: Kubra & Sughra - Al-Madd Al-Laazim: Kalimee - Al-Madd Al-Laazim: Harfee.

 

Al-Madd Al-Tabee’ee January 25, 2011

NOTE: if you are new to the website, please click here for a brief guide.

In the same way we sometimes wished that our holiday period can be a little longer, your tongue, ears and some letters themselves wish that they’re said for a little longer. ‘Why?’, you may think… Well, how obscure to the ear is it to hear someone say a dammah instead of a waaw? And how hard is it for them to continue the ayah without stumbling (after not prolonging)? … Let’s start by looking at this first prolongation…

Al-Madd Al-tabee‘ee: normal/natural prolongation is the act of prolonging or “stretching” the sound of the three madd letters:

ي          و          أ

alif     waaw     yaa

for two counts, i.e. the time it takes to say (one-two).

The rule has the following conditions:

The huroof al-madd must all be silent, i.e. have no diacritic on them.

A fat-ha must be present on the letter before a silent alif

A dammah must be present on the letter before a silent waaw

A kasrah must be present on the letter before a silent yaa.

Examples of this are as follow:

________

___qaala          qeela               yaqoolu

These examples can be combined into one word to help you remember the rule. The word is

نُوحِيهَا

nooheehaa

I really want to stress the fact that in the Quran you will not see a diacritic on these three letters if they are in the state of madd.

It will be an alif, waaw, or yaa with no fat-ha, dammah, kasra, or sukoon ontop/underneath. When I say that these letters must be silent, I am not saying they have sukoon. In fact, if you see a sukoon on an alif or waaw or yaa it means that you are not to stretch this letter whatsoever.

An example of sukoon present on these letters is as follows:

Mala-ihi

NOT: Mala-eehi

Aaminoo

NOT: Aaminooaa

Ulaa-ika

NOT: Uoolaa-ika

A final thing to be wary of is something called “‘ella” letters. This is when the three madd letters have no diacrtic on them, but are not prolonged because the letter preceeding them does not have the corresponding diacritic mentioned in the above conditions. This will be further discussed in a later post, insha Allah.

Resources Link:

-Sukoon [Gatway To Arabic: page 48]

-Makhaarij Al-Huroof [dot points 5, 7, 12, 15]

-Short and long vowels  [Gatway To Arabic: pages 21-23; and 44-47]

-Tajweed Rule [Gatway To Arabic: page 4-6 and first half of page 7]

Note, these documents are found on the resources page.

Related Posts: Ahkaam Al-MaddAl-Madd Al-Waajib Al-MutasilAl-Madd Al-Jaa’ez Al-MunfasilAl-Madd Al-’IwadAl-Madd Al-BadalAl-Madd Al-LeenAl-Madd Al-‘Aarid Lil Sukoon - Al-Madd Al-Silah: Kubra & Sughra - Al-Madd Al-Laazim: Kalimee - Al-Madd Al-Laazim: Harfee.

 

Ahkaam Al-Madd January 12, 2011

NOTE: if you are new to the website, please click here for a brief guide.

One of the largest sections of Tajweed is Ahkaam Al-Madd. There are 9 different types of madd, with two further splitting into five segments, therefore making the total of 13.

To help me remember these mudood (plural of madd), I drew up a table with the name of each madd, the length of it in the two states [where applicable], and placed an example in the last column. This file can be found in the resources page, under the heading, Jadwal Al-Mudood.

It will slowly start making sense as I post the specifics of each madd.

To conclude, and perhaps this should have been introduced instead, a madd is “prolongation”. And so “Ahkaam Al-Mudood” means “Rules of Prolongation”.

As I have now completed posting the nine mudood, select one from the list below to begin!

Related Posts: Al-Madd Al-Tabee’eeAl-Madd Al-Waajib Al-MutasilAl-Madd Al-Jaa’ez Al-MunfasilAl-Madd Al-’IwadAl-Madd Al-BadalAl-Madd Al-LeenAl-Madd Al-‘Aarid Lil Sukoon - Al-Madd Al-Silah: Kubra & Sughra - Al-Madd Al-Laazim: Kalimee - Al-Madd Al-Laazim: Harfee.

 

Al-Qalqalah January 4, 2011

NOTE: if you are new to the website, please click here for a brief guide.

This-is-is    post-ost-ost    will-ill-ill    be-be-be    about-out-out    Qalqalah-ah-ah…

But what is Qalqalah? First, be rest assured I won’t type echos for the rest of the post. Because it’d get a tad annoying for both author and reader. The word itself sounds repetitive and as interesting as it’s Tajweed rule.

Qalqalah: sound articulation and echo. In essence the word means shaking/disturbance. In Tajweed, it means to disturb the letter that has sukoon, i.e. that is saakin, but without any corresponding movement of the mouth and jaw that is associated with voweled letters (i.e. letters that have fat-ha, dammah, or kasra). Qalqalah “shakes” to “echo” the letter without taking up the preceding or succeeding letter’s diacritic.

To explain:

There are five letters in the Arabic alphabet that apply to Qalqalah. These five letters are:

ق          ط          ب          ج          د

daal      jeem       baa       tah      qaaf

To easily remember these letters, remember the phrase they make up, (قطب جد).

Simply, Qalqalah is echoing the above five letters when they are in state of sukoon, i.e.

قْ     طْ     بْ     جْ     دْ

To feel the importance of Qalqalah, try saying (أط), how about (أق) you’ll find one of two things happen. Either the back end of your tongue gets stuck and it’s difficult to loosen it and breathe, or your tongue will naturally slip and the back of your mouth is open again. It is this “slipping” that Qalqalah is based on. Disturbing the letter without moving your jaw or mouth. Try it for the rest of the letters, (أد) and (أج) and (أب). Imagine trying to say the word,

أبْناء

If there was no “slipping”/”shaking”/”echoing” of the letter baa (بْ) then how hard would it be to say the noon (ن) straight away with your lips still pressed together? Doing Qalqalah will cause your lips to “slip” a bit i.e. open up a tiny bit without adding a diacritic to the baa, to make it easy to pronounce the noon. On a final note, as one Imam puts it,

The qalqalah is necessary for these letters because they have the attributes of jahr (stoppage of the flow of breath) and shiddah (stoppage of the flow of sound), so without qalqalah, there would be no sound!

But as the blog has not covered attributes of letters yet, this might just sound all too surreal for some.

There are three types of Qalqalah:

Qalqalah Kubra (Strong Echo): occurs at the end of an ayah.

Qalqalah Wusta (Medium Echo): occurs at the end of a word in the middle of an ayah.

Qalqalah Sughra (Subtle Echo): occurs in the middle of a word whether at the beginning, middle or end of an ayah.

Examples of Qalqalah:

Kubra (strong):

_______Kasab __________________ Al-falaq

________Muheet _________________Masad _________________ Al-ma’aarij


You may notice the the last letters that require Qalqalah don’t actually have sukoon drawn above them! Diacritics have been put in place for readers who want to continue reading without a pause through to the next ayah. However, stopping at the end of every ayah is preferred and so in these such circumstances you must do a strong Qalqalah.

Wusta (middle):

qad aflaha ___________najid lahu

 

Here the sukoon is clearly marked on the Qalqalah letters.

V.I.Note: if you run out of breath and wish to stop in the middle of an ayah, and you stop at a word that has a qalqalah letter on the end, you must, must, must read it as a qalqalah kubra! For example, if I wanted to stop at the word qad in the above example, the daal must be echoed strongly. Then if I were to continue reading by repeating the word and continuing, I do a qalqalah wusta.

Here’s the example again:

[reciting] … [out of breath] … [stopping at word qad] … [doing a strong echo on the daal] … [takes breath] … [wants to continue] …

[start at the word qad and reads: qad aflaha, doing a qalqalah wusta on the daal].

Simple!

Sughra (subtle):

khalaqna _ _______________tat-heeran _____________________ abnaa’akum__

Similarly the sukoon is clearly marked on the Qalqalah letters.

Resources Link:

-Tajweed Rule [Tajweed Basics: Foundations and More: page 9]

-Sukoon [Gatway To Arabic: page 48]

-Makhaarij Al-Huroof [dot points 5, 7, 12, 15]

 


I suggest visiting Quranic Audio to listen to Qalqalah.

Select your favourite reciter and listen to Surat Al-Falaq [113]/Al-Masad [111]/Al-Qiyaamah [75] for Qalqalah kubra.

Qalqalah wusta and sughra occur throughout the entire Quran. I don’t think there is any particular one you really should listen to. Surat Al-Qalam [68] has a fair few Qalqalah sughra. I also suggest Surat Al-Muzzamil [73] for a combination of wusta and sughra.

 

Al-Meem Al-Saakinah: rule three December 24, 2010

NOTE: if you are new to the website, please click here for a brief guide.

Clarity is sometimes what we’re all after. Likewise, some things just need to be said as clear as mmmmud. Right?

Rule three: Ith-haar Shafawee (pronouncing the meem clearly)

Ith-haar Shafawee is pronouncing the meem saakinah (مْ) clearly and occurs when any of the remaining [excluding the letters meem and baa (ب)] follow a meem saakinah. The condition here is that these letters have a diacritic on them, (fat-ha, dammah, kasra).

Examples of Ith-haar Shafawee:

mathaluhum kamathali

am lahum

hum feehaa

Resources Link:

-Sukoon [Gatway To Arabic: page 48]

-Tajweed Rule [Tajweed Basics: Foundations and More: second half page 10]

Related Pages: Al-Meem Al-Saakinah: ikhfaa shafaweeAl-Meem Al-Saakinah: idghaam shafawee

 

Al-Meem Al-Saakinah: rule two December 16, 2010

NOTE: if you are new to the website, please click here for a brief guide.

The first rule for Al-Meem Al-Saakinah looked at the succession of a meem after a meem saakinah (مْ).

The second rule looks at meem saakinah followed by a baa (ب).

Rule two: Ikhfaa Shafawee (Hiding the sound by the use of the lips)

The second rule is enacted only when the latter baa follows a silent meem (meem saakinah). The condition here is that the baa must be mutaharik, i.e. have a diacritic (fat-ha, dammah, kasra).

The sound of the meem is hidden and the lips are shaped, ready to pronounce the baa. You may ask how can the meem be hidden? The answer is simple: do not press your two lips together completely [as you would if you were to pronounce a full meem]. Leave a very little gap and let the sound of the meem come from the deeper part of your mouth while you prepare to say the baa. By letting the meem come from the inner mouth, it’s sound stays encapsulated behind the teeth, and so the meem is hidden. Remember that this rule is carried out for two counts, i.e. the time it takes to say the words, “one – two”.

On a different, yet very important, note…

The rules for Al-Noon Al-Saakinah used a shaddah for notice purposes, i.e. to remind the reader to carry out the Al-Noon Al-Saakinah rule. Here, instead, the meem remains completely free of any diacritic. This is a notice for the reader to do ikhfaa shafawee.

And one last thing to recall…

At the end of the meem rules, I keep using the word “shafawee“. This is very important to distinguish the normal noon saakinah/tanween idghaam/ith-haar/ikhfaa from the ones done by the lips for the meem saakinah.

Examples of Ikhfaa Shafawee:

hum bil-aakhirati

tarmeehem bi-hijaaraten

ayyuhum bithaalika

Resources Link:

-Sukoon [Gatway To Arabic: page 48]

-Tajweed Rule [Tajweed Basics: Foundations and More: second half page 10]

-Makhaarij Al-Huroof [dot point 15]

Related Pages: Al-Meem Al-Saakinah: ith-haar shafaweeAl-Meem Al-Saakinah: idghaam shafawee

 

Al-Meem Al-Saakinah: rule one December 12, 2010

NOTE: if you are new to the website, please click here for a brief guide.

As with Al-Noon Al-Saakinah, Al-meem Al-saakinah has it’s own Tajweed rules.

The fourth rule for Al-Noon Al-Saakinah described what idghaam is. Because meem is a letter pronounced using the lips[1] the rule differs a bit.

Rule one: Idghaam Shafawee (Lip-based Merging or Merging with the use of lips).

For any meem saakinah, when a second meem follows it, Idghaam Shafawee is sounded for two counts, i.e. the time it takes to say the words, “one – two”. The condition here is that the latter meem has a fat-ha, dammah or kasra on it. Note a shaddah on the second meem is drawn as a notice of this rule [i.e. it is not there for shaddah purposes].

Examples of Idghaam Shafawee are as follow:

___ __

lahum maa ____quloobihim maradun

__ _____

faghashiyahum mina ______ am man

Simple as that. Practice makes perfect.

Resources Link:

-Idghaam [Tajweed Basics: Foundations and More: page 12]

-Sukoon [Gatway To Arabic: page 48]

-Tajweed Rule [Tajweed Basics: Foundations and More: second half page 10]

Related Pages: Al-Meem Al-Saakinah: ith-haar shafaweeAl-Meem Al-Saakinah: ikhfaa shafawee


[1] -View the document ‘Maakharij Al -Huroof’ or ‘Tajweed Basics: Foundations and More’ pages 3 and 4 titled Origin of Letters

 

Noon and Meem Mushaddadah December 10, 2010

NOTE: if you are new to the website, please click here for a brief guide.

shaddah

Qaala sanashuddu ‘adudaka bi akheeka

Allah said: “We will strengthen your arm through your brother..”

In the Arabic language, there are diacritics [including the fat-ha, dhammah and kasrah] that can be the reason a word’s meaning changes completely. One of these diacritics is the shaddah. Insha Allah I will briefly explain what this is and move on to the Tajweed rule regarding the Noon and Meem letters that have a shaddah.

Directly translating the word shaddah, results in the meaning “[sign of] emphasis”. In general language, it means to pull or make something tight. But how does the shaddah actually function? It stresses a letter by doubling it’s sound. As given in a previous post [see "Al-Noon Al-Saakinah: rule four"], a  shaddah consists of two letters [hence the doubling]:

The first letter is a saakin, i.e. it has sukoon on it

The second letter has a respective diacritic, fat-ha, dammah, or kasrah.

The example given in the previous post was:

fawaylun lillatheena

Here we noted that the first shaddah on the laam was there for notice purposes, and the second was there to be a shaddah and double that second laam. And so the word is read as:

lil-latheena as written above, lillatheena

See, two laam‘s.

Just to be sure it all makes sense, a few more examples of shaddah are as follow:

________________

kar-ratan fanatabar-ra‘a _______________ it-tabi‘u

karratan fanatabarra’a _______________ ittabi‘u

wal mutal-laqaatu yatarab-basna

wal mutallaqaatu yatarabbasna


bu‘ulatuhun-na ahaq-qu birad-dihin-na

bu‘ulatuhunna ahaqqu biraddihinna


To briefly explain the colour code. The light green is where the doubling of the letter occurs. The darker green is the respective diacritic that follows the doubling.

Now that the shaddah is down-pat understood, the Tajweed rule regarding the shaddah is as follows.

For every noon and meem mushaddad, i.e. for every noon and meem that have a shaddah, one must sound a ghunnah.

Recall a ghunnah is the sound made entirely by the nose [nasal passage]. It is almost like a hum and completes the sound of the noon or meem. Ghunnah is directly translated to “nasalisation” and this should not be longer than two counts. i.e. similar to the time it takes to say the words: “one – two”

This rule in Arabic is called, ghunnat noon/meem mushaddadah.

It is the simplest rule, because you just need to check, does the noon/meem have a shaddah on top? If so, sound a ghunnah.

Examples for ghunnat noon mushadadah are:

____________________

Examples of ghunnat meem mushaddadah are:

____________________

And it’s as simple as that! This Tajweed rule is complete! Where you see a shaddah on a meem or noon, just do a ghunnah.

But wait.

As I mentioned, diacritics have the ability to change the entire meaning of a word/sentence. I don’t like to just say things, so let’s prove it.

Let’s look at the word:

دَرَسَ

darasa

Darasa means “he studied”. Now let’s add a shaddah to this word:

دَرَّسَ

dar-rasa

Darrasa means “he taught”. Very simple, very big difference. One more example.

The sentence:

بَكى صَبِيٌّ

bakaa sabiy-yun

This sentence means “a boy cried”.

Adding another two shaddah causes two things, letters alif and laam to be added making the boy an object being pointed to, and the meaning to change.

Note:

بَكَّى الصَّبِيُّ

bak-kaa al-sabiy-yu

Which means “[he] made the boy cry”.

Later you will come to realise that not only do diacritics change the meaning of things, but so does the pronunciation of a letter.

As for Tajweed, just remember shaddah + meem or noon = ghunnah.

Resources Link:

-Shaddah [Tajweed Basics: Foundations and More: page 2]

[Gatway To Arabic: page 49]

-Ghunnah [Tajweed Basics: Foundations and More: page 2]

-Diacritics [Tajweed Basics: Foundations and More: page 4]

Practicing diacritics exercises up to page 6

[Gateway To Arabic: pages 21 - 24]

-Tajweed Rule [Tajweed Basics: Foundations and More: first half page 10]

Note, these documents are found on the resources page.

… ارخيلا بتنرخا

 

Al-Noon Al-Saakinah: rule four December 7, 2010

NOTE: if you are new to the website, please click here for a brief guide.

merging colours

Merging things together can be heaps of fun. I tend to enjoy combining colours together to create new, fascinating ones. The fourth rule for Al-Noon Al-Saakinah is all about merging/combining. This rule is said to be one of the most complicated rules. But there is nothing to fret about because practice makes perfect, insha Allah.

Rule four: Al-Idghaam — Al-Idkhaal (To merge with)

There are two types of Idghaam. and from these two, a couple more branch out. Take a look at the diagram below:

idghaam typesSo what does all this mean?

Let’s start with what ghunnah means.

Ghunnah: A ghunnah is the sound made entirely by the nose [this is in regards to the sounds coming from the mouth].

An Idghaam bi ghunnah occurs with any Tanween or Noon Saakinah if it is followed by any of these letters:

ي       ن       م       و

waw meem noon yaa

This completes the first level of the diagram when following the rightmost arrow.

Merging without ghunnah, i.e. Idghaam bila ghunnah occurs when the letters

ل    ر

raa   laam

follow a Noon Saakinah or Tanween. Now the leftmost arrow of the first level of the diagram is complete. [i.e. the entire first level is now complete].

With these two letters, raa and laam, their idghaam is called: idghaam bila ghunnah kaamel, or in English, merging without ghunnah fully.

Here the “nn” sound from the Tanween or Noon Saakinah is completely eliminated and the laam or raa are said straight away without any emphasis on their sounds. Hence why the “fully” is added onto the end – i.e. noting that the “nn” sound is “fully” wiped out.

Examples of idghaam bila ghunnah kaamel / merging without ghunnah fully:

merging without ghunnah
waylun likulli humazatin lumazah

The two “n” I have in red are completely eliminated and so the verse is read as,

waylulikulli humazatilumaza

Notice the two green letters are now the place where the two words are connected without the Tanween. Some students [and I know quite a few] have trouble in the beginning trying to connect two words without the “nn” sound in between. They end up “leaning on” the laam or raa and saying them as though there is a shaddah[1] on these two letters. However there isn’t.

But here you may protest that in fact there is. Look at the example above. There is a shaddah on the laam in both cases for the words likulli and lumazah. This shaddah is not there for shaddah purposes. It has been put there as a notice to the reader that the Tanween (or Noon Saakinah) is not to be pronounced at all, not even through the nasal passage.

Below is a second example using a Noon Saakinah.

merging noon

min rabbi read as, mir-rabbi

While I still have your attention [I hope], and avoiding any confusion possible, insha Allah, I’ll continue on with the rightmost arrow, merging with ghunnah.

Recall that a ghunnah is a sound made entirely by the nose [nasalisation], somewhere between a hum and a moan. Like an aeroplane engine, probably. The merging with ghunnah letters as above have two categories. “Full” and “lesser”. Full idghaam means that this aeroplane humming comes through sounding a lot stronger than it would when the lesser one is made. The letters,

ن      م

meem noon

coincide with a full idgham bi ghunnah, where as the remaining letters,

ي       و

waw yaa

are to be said with a “lesser idgham bi ghunnah“. Idgham bi ghunnah, whether fuller or lesser is sounded for two counts, similar to the time it takes to say the words, “one – two”.

Examples of a full idghaam bi ghunnah:

____________

rasoolun min                                min marqadinaa

min maarijen min naaren

(3 occurrences of a fuller idghaam bi ghunnah)

note: min maarij   -   maarijen min   -   min naar


Examples of lesser idghaam bi ghunnah:

dalaalatun walaakinni

min yawmihem

 

Examples of idghaam bila ghunnah kaamel:

bideenaaren la

fawaylun lillatheena

Notice here the shaddah on the first laam is to note the ruling of idghaam bila ghunnah kaamel. The second shaddah however is there for shaddah purposes. You are to “double” the sound of the second laam so it is said as I’ve written above, lil-latheena.

 

Idghaam is something I find very beautiful. It’s adds a tremendous tone to recitation and I think it, alongside the rule regarding noon and meem mushadadah, adds a very serene and tranquil sensation for the both listener and reader.

What’s that rule I just mentioned? Keep an eye out for new posts.

 

Resources Link:

-Shaddah [Tajweed Basics: Foundations and More: page 2]

[Gatway To Arabic: page 49]

-Idghaam [Tajweed Basics: Foundations and More: page 12]

-Tanween [Gatway To Arabic: pages 40-43]

-Sukoon [Gatway To Arabic: page 48]

 

Related Pages: Al-Noon Al-Saakinah: ith-haarAl-Noon Al-Saakinah: ikhfaaAl-Noon Al-Saakinah: iqlaab


[1]Shaddah: is to double the sound of a letter so that it is stressed. Such a letter is said to be mushaddad.


 

Al-Noon Al-Saakinah: rule three December 5, 2010

NOTE: if you are new to the website, please click here for a brief guide.

Allahuma ya muqaliba al-quloob thabit qalbi ‘ala deenika

اللهم يا مُقلِّبَ القُلوب … ثبتْ قَلبي على دينكَ




Rule Three: Iqlaab — Tahweel Al-shay’ ‘an wajh (Flipping).

After every Noon Saakinah or Tanween, if the letter baa (ب) follows, the sound must be flipped [i.e. changed] to the sound of the letter meem (م). This is represented by a little meem on top of the letter itself as pictured below:

The lips should not be entirely pressed together, to allow for the meem to come through the nasal passage as well. The mouth should be prepared to say the baa after sounding through the meem. So the above, min b‘ad is sounds like mimm b‘ad when read. What ever you do, take this piece of advice and do not get mixed up between the full shaped meem (م) drawn above letters to indicate iqlaab, and the cut meem (مـ) to indicated a compulsory stop. Refer to the resources link below. Iqlaab must be sounded for two counts, i.e. the time it takes to say the words, “one – two”.

Examples of the third rule are as follow:

example one: min b‘ad – منْ بَعْدِ

example two: layunbathanna – لَيُنْبِذَنَّ

example three: samee‘an baseeran – سَمِيعَاً بَصِيراً

Resources Link:

- Sukoon [Gateway to Arabic, page 48]

- Rules of stopping [Tajweed Basics: Foundations and More: page 15]

- Tanween [Gateway to Arabic: page 40]

[Tajweed Basics: Foundations and More: pages 11 - 14]

Related Pages: Al-Noon Al-Saakinah: ith-haarAl-Noon Al-Saakinah: ikhfaaAl-Noon Al-Saakinah: idghaam


More about the Arabic letters can be found here: http://www.meem.freeuk.com/ scroll down to the “ABJAD TABLE” and select a letter.

اللهم يا مُقلِّبَ القلوب ثبتْ قلبي على دينك

 

Al-Noon Al-Saakinah: rule two December 4, 2010

NOTE: if you are new to the website, please click here for a brief guide.

The following is rule two of four for the Noon Al-Saakinah/Tanween.

We all know the children’s game, hide and seek. Here, the Noon Al-Saakinah must be hidden [i.e. not pronounced clearly]. Read on.

Hide And Seek

Rule Two: Ikhfaa — Al-sitr (where the Noon/Tanween is not pronounced clearly, i.e. is hidden).

The first rule listed six letters that follow the noon al-saakinah. In that case, it must be pronounced clearly. Of the remaining letters in the Arabic alphabet, the second rule, ikhfaa applies.

The letters which are covered in rules three and four, are the exception to this rule.

These letters are:

ب    و    م    ن    ي    ر    ل

laam    raa    yaa   noon    meem    waa    baa

When one of the remaining letters follows a noon saakinah or tanween, ikhfaa must be done. This is when the noon saakinah or tanween is hidden in the nose. Here, the mouth is to be shaped in a manner such that it is “prepared” for the next letter. For example, if the next letter is a taa with a dhammah then the mouth is prepared to say this by changing it into a small “o” shape, and the tongue positions itself in the right place within the mouth[2]. This can occur across two words or be contained in one.

Ikhfaa must be sounded for two counts, i.e. the time it takes to say the words, “one – two”.

Examples of the second rule are as follow:

example one: min qabl –   منْ قبلِ

example two: kitaabun kareem –   كِتابٌ كريم

example three: antum –   أنْتم

It is not necessary that you learn all these letters. It is however advised that you learn the 6 ith-haar, and 7 exception, letters and so when reading, just do a quick check to see if the letter is not one of the 6 ith-haar letters, or the exception letters above, then do ikhfaa. This takes a while to get used to, and soon you’ll forget you even have to do a check because you internalise it.

Besides, it’d be almost the impossible to try and bring out an “nn” sound from your nasal passage when needing to shape your mouth for a “h” sound for haa, or an “a” sound for alif.

Resources Link:

- Sukoon [Gateway to Arabic, page 48]

- Makhaarij Al-Huroof

Related Pages: Al-Noon Al-Saakinah: ith-haarAl-Noon Al-Saakinah: idghaamAl-Noon Al-Saakinah: iqlaab


[1] – More about the Arabic letters can be found here: http://www.meem.freeuk.com/ scroll down to the “ABJAD TABLE” and select a letter.
[2] – Refer to the document Makhaarij Al-Huroof under the resources page.

 

Al-Noon Al-Saakinah: rule one December 3, 2010

NOTE: if you are new to the website, please click here for a brief guide.

As per people, letters are different. You find some people are quiet, other are loud. But regardless of this, there are places when even the loud ones must be quiet! Take for example, the library or art gallery.

Quiet Zone

In Tajweed there are rules regarding the silent noon[1]. This is known as “Al-Noon Al-Saakinah” in Arabic. The rules regarding the silent noon also apply to tanween [2].

Rule One: Ith-haar Al-Bayan (where the noon/tanween is pronounced clearly).

It’s pronounced clearly only when the following is true:

The noon has a sukoon[3] on it (نْ) and one of the following letters come after it (whether in the same word or following one)[4]:

alif, haa, khaa, ayn, ghayn, haa

هـ     غ      ع       خ       ح      أ

Note this also applies for the Tanween.

Examples of this are as follow:

example one: hakeemin hameed-حكيمٍ حميد

example two: an aqeemoo - أنْ أقيموا

Please note that I have put up very beneficial documents under the “resources” page. I hope these are of benefit.

Resources Link:

- Tanween [Gateway to Arabic: page 40]

[Tajweed Basics: Foundations and More: pages 11 - 14]

- Sukoon [Gateway to Arabic: page 48]

Related Pages: Al-Noon Al-Saakinah: ikhfaaAl-Noon Al-Saakinah: idghaamAl-Noon Al-Saakinah: iqlaab


[1]noon: the 25th Arabic letter, that makes a “n” sound, such as in the words, “n”ear, “n”or, A”nn”. The letter in arabic is written as ن

An interesting website all about the letter noon is here: http://www.meem.freeuk.com/Noon.html

[2]The tanween is an “n” sound added to the end of the word in certain circumstances, usually it functions just like the “a” and “an” in English, indicating an indefinite article. The word tanween, usually translated as “nunation”, means “to ‘n’”, or “‘n’ing”, making an “n” sound. There are three types of tanween:

1- fat-ha tanween
2 – kasra tanween
3 – damma tanween

fat-ha tanween: The fat-ha tanween is pronounced “an”, as in “animal”.

kasra tanween: The kasra tanween is pronouced “in”, as in “in”, “tin”, “fin”, etc. Some native Arabic speakers might indicate a kasra tanween with an “en”, thinking that “e” sounds like the Arabic “yaa” letter. This is a mistake that stems from not knowing how native English speakers pronounce the “e” sound.

damma tanween: The dhamma tanween is pronounced as a short “oo” followed by an “n”. This sounds like the short “un” in “uno”, not like the long “oon” in “soon”.

tanween at the end of a sentence: If the tanween is the last thing in the sentence, it’s not pronounced. In the case of a fat-ha tanween, the alif is pronounced as a long vowel.

[3] – More about sukoon can be found here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arabic_diacritics#Suk.C5.ABn

[4] – More about these letters can be found here: http://www.meem.freeuk.com/ scroll down to the “ABJAD TABLE” and select one of the abovementioned letters to learn more about it.

 

Tajweed: The Foundations December 2, 2010

NOTE: if you are new to the website, please click here for a brief guide.

Tajweed Foundation

Tajweed Foundation

Tajweed is to give every letter it’s right and pronounce it from the correct place in the  mouth/nose/throat. The word itself means “to make better”

In Tajweed there is “fard kifaayah[1], where not all people must know a certain rule. Example of this in Islam is the prayer of the dead. “Fard ayn[2] is compulsory for all Muslims to do/learn, i.e. reading with Tajweed .

There are three types of reading:

1- Al-tahqeeq: where Quran is read very slowly with Tajweed
2 – Al-tadweer: where Quran is read at a medium pace with Tajweed
3 – Al-hadr: where Quran is read quickly with Tajweed

 

Resources Link:

- Tajweed Basics: Foundations and More: pages 1 – 3 and midway of page 4


[1] – Sufficiency duty or fard al-kifaya (الواجب الكفائي‎) is a duty which is imposed on the whole community of believers (ummah). The classic example for it is jihad: the individual is not required to perform it as long as a sufficient number of community members fulfil it.
[2] – Individual duty or fard al-ayn (الواجب العين) relates to tasks every Muslim is required to perform, such as daily prayer (salah), hijab, or the pilgrimage to Mecca at least once in a lifetime (hajj).